20 Year Old Embryo Becomes a Baby… And…?

Okay, so here’s the gist: A potential mommy who was having a problem conceiving got some eggs fertilized and did some IVF (in vitro fertilization) to get a baby… back in 1990.  Baby comes.  Mommy #1 has some viable embryos left, has them frozen, and anonymously donates them to whomever needs them.

Enter potential mommy #2… who in 2000 starts trying to have a baby via IVF with said leftover embryos.  Blam, 2010 it finally happens (at 42 years of age), and baby gets delivered healthy & happy.  So… now the 2010 baby has been born, and he/she has out in the world what can scientifically be considered a fraternal twin sibling… a brother or sister that was fertilized at the same time as this baby with same mommy egg and daddy sperm… BUT 2010 baby is actually 20 years younger now than its previous twin sibling (setting a record for birth of a frozen embryo at 20 years).

So… a ton of questions come to mind:

What are your thoughts on the baby’s soul…?  Are there a spiritual effect due to the delay of the birth?

Is the process of freezing embryos playing too close to God territory?

Will there be a connection between the twins like twins born together have, or will the time and mommy differentiation quash that?

Share whatever pops into your mind.  Here’s a little excerpt from PopSci.com:

But the ethical and practical implications of keeping potential humans on ice are now becoming abundantly clear. Increasingly, divorced couples fight over frozen embryos. And the preservation of genetic material – embryos, eggs, and sperm — created by biological parents who may be well beyond their reproductive years gives others pause. In 2007, a mother froze eggs for use by her daughter, then seven years old, who was born with a condition that could make her infertile. If the daughter someday uses the embryos, she will give birth to her half-brother or half-sister.

 

So… what do you think?  If you need to, you can read the whole article here.

Thoughts?

 

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